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paris couture. eglin said this young man looking very serious as he sits -- you will see this young man looking very serious as he sits and you will realize this is not a miracle. there was a solid basis. the other thing i want to say is that, you know, they're not many designers are around here changed the course of history. because when it comes to fashion, yes, there are lots of things that we see. lots of excitement, lots of fralala going on, but we do not often see things that you realize have captured the moment in time. and that is what i think you'll find in this exhibition. but i do not want to talk anymore, because those are actually some of the believes that you have come to listen to jean paul gaultier and not suzy menkes. [laughter] so jean paul, i really wanted to ask you, thinking we're going through the exhibition from the beginning, the power you give women with the sexuality with the corsets, that actually was very much a reflection of what was going on when you did it. can you tell us about those madonna corset years? >> yes, it is a kind of a reflection of what is h
of paris but not to the streets that we know that are in front of the palace but the streets with a very mixed community. in those days, even more so. and that inspired you to do collections. this was in a way breaking a parisian code, wasn't it? instead of pretending these immigrants were not there, you're actually inspired by their colors, their hair, their clothes, and you turn them into your collection. >> definitely. i was very inspired by different people always. maybe -- with me, i felt a little different. a project at school. for example, not doing football. i was more touched by people that are a little different or could be rejected. they inspire me also because i do not know it was another world. for inspiration, for example, because close very clearly, very early became my attraction -- clothes became nmy attraction, a subsection. as more attractive to addressing people than addressing myself. it was not my objective desire, my own person. so i think that if i looked, the market inspire me. people different in it the streets or inspiring me. not what was fashion. maybe i was
of the elegance of paris. and i remember that i propose -- it was the last new bid of coutoure that arrived. i thought to propose -- [unintelligible] why don't you take one designer like vivian westwood or others to make one season, one coutoure collection? >> you should call some up immediately and suggest the deal. >> [laughs] that is true. each one to make their own collection should not be back. a very attractive idea. >> as you do not want to talk about art, we will not say your work is art. let's be very vulgar and talk about money. [laughter] it is extraordinary what you have produced in coutoure. does that make any money? quick to be honest, what we produce in coutoure does not make money but it does include money. i must say, i am very proud of that. when i started to do coutoure, after a lot of stories that may be issued do another job, i said, ok, i will do my own collection. i started and never stopped after. on boat one, one woman, done all in lace in the exhibition. it starts like, ok, i did not think to make another one. so i did one after and one after and one after peter i am
it is very conservative in paris. >> only you had come to san francisco. >> yes. >> i can only imagine what you would have produced. [applause] >> that is true. >> here is this good little boy who is be heading classically and is very charming and wonderful and working hard. how did you turn into a bad boy? [laughter] and tell us about the whole business of putting sexuality on the map, as it were. when you go into the exhibition here, it is still shocking to see some of the clothes which are suggesting a kind of pervert petit, never against women. you see a lot of flash and tattoos and in the clothing. it must've been completely taboo when you started doing the mine in 1970's and early 1980's. >> i think it was, yes. it was, to be honest, all the things i did that were supposed to be provocative or maybe that make me called a bad boy to the french, because some of the journalists saw that was making jokes and things like that, provocative things. it was not as a provocation. my goal is to be known, so i have to make them be seen this way. it was more because of my reflection and also what
. more to the point, london out is tremendously diverse. paris is becoming in admitting that it is more a diversity, and there's a little line for me quite hidden away the says i'm very much a parisian or i'm interested in parisian women, but not quite sure that i ever met a parisian woman. what do you mean by that? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely
to show the video. we heard that paris hilton has been playing this youtube video as well, so thank you paris. >> great. i think i will check it out now. >> we are here to talk about the birth of the baby girl. she's the one with the little orange head and we are one of the most successful zoos for breeding them and langers do things like passing the infant around from female to female and spreads parenting responsibilities out and mom gets something to eat and not too tired and this gives the mom a break and helps the older sister develop parenting skills she will need in the future. we are proud of having this species here at the zoo and less than 2,000 in the wild and why this breeding effort is important. since she has been born the giants are doing well and will stay black and orange and come on out to the san francisco zoo. >> that is a great reference. >> would anyone like to make public comment on this item? seeing none public comment is closed. we are on item seven. >> good morning commissioners and general manager. i am marvin yee with the parks and rec department. the
of people and byron and the rest of the committee and lead by karen paris and friends at the park conservation. we have steve from the engineering group. we have dan -- who i see i missed. excuse me. we have dpw who did the design for the area. we have them with the living classroom and maybe it was going to be in another area but it's going to be here at
dreaming of paris where my grandparents, my grandfather, spend many important years of his life. also i want to move to my place, i don't know what was the name of that place. every time people call me la englicita, the little english woman because in cuba, in the caribbean, they didn't make any difference. all the irish were english. and all the people from asia were chinese. all the jews were called polacos, polish. that is interesting because the irish were part of the spanish community in cuba, but usually they didn't make the difference. so they call me and they call my father el inglis, the english guy. so when they call me that and when my name suffered many different spellings. later on in life, in the 70's, i had many identification cards with names like coffee that i didn't drink at the time, so i began drinking coffee later on, names like caufildo and garfield, my favorite one, that made me wonder if the bureaucrats at the id office knew that i really love cats. without my garfield id, i left havana in 1981 and went to zurich, switzerland, thanks to james joyce. my dancing th
will be able to access the controls. in paris already, they are rounding the pedestrian signals through blue tooth and into people's phones. so the future is really exciting and technology will make it quite a journey for everybody. >> thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> so now i would like to introduce the chief engineer. can you tell us about your experience? >> there were a lot of anticipation about how people would respond. at first, we had to get in front of people to direct them from their habits. early morning, they are more into carrying their coffee and going inside of the elevator and then spilling their coffee to hit the keys. we got right in front of them, stopped them and told them exactly what they had to do. that helped out a lot. the other thing that helped were the lights in the lobby would tell them where the elevator was. a lot of these systems have not done that. we were the first to do that. the nice thing is we've got less spills in the lobby, too. you get into the elevator in the morning, and somebody is standing in front of the buttons and you can
in a small apartment of about 300 square feet in os low, in paris and copenhagen and the difference between that and my larger apartment here in san francisco those were nice and the one here is crappy. i can hear my neighbors when there was a discussion. over there the walls were thick. it was warm and nice appliances and taken the walls were taken care it and it should include a certain decibel readying so you can't hear them next door and if public housing is considered a priority housing subsidies should be considered and this is probably the only time i will speak to the commission because it's not my job to come here and speak to you. i think surterrainian freeway and subway along 19th avenue and turning that into a opportunity to sell to individual housing owners or developers or whatever and that would create a lot of land for housing for this city. thank you. >> would you like to offer public comment? you can leave it right there. thank you. is there any additional general public comment? >> good afternoon president fong and commission. my name is karen mint and i am a bu
and the rest of the committee and lead by karen paris and friends at the park conservation. we have steve from the engineering group. we have dan -- who i see i missed. excuse me. we have dpw who did the design for the area. we have them with the living classroom and maybe it was going to be in another area but it's going to be here at the port of san francisco and had the help of a number of agencies and the parks department and keeping as gorgeous and welcoming as it is. this part was not a park for long. originally this was supposed to be a terminal and imagine if we can containers stacked around here. instead we have a place for humans to come and enjoy, dogs to come and enjoy, the children come and learn about the natural habitat about one of the areas that is best weather wise and we are proud to reinvent ourselves and use our ability to make it all better. i would like to thank the mta with their vision and the blue green way on cargo lane and of course last but not least the park of rec and park and without them we wouldn't be here today having this great celebration and i hope y
's trying to be the paris of the west. now the beach is the suburbs, the we will their people lived on the bottom and the poorest people lived on the top because it was very hard getting to the top of telegraph hill. it was mostly lean-to sharks and bits of pieces of houses up here in the beginning. and a group of 20 businessmen decided that it would be better if the top of the hill remained for the public. so they put their money down and they bought four lots at the top of the hill and they gave them to the city. lily hitchcock coit died without leaving a specific use for her bequest. she left a third of her estate for the beautify indication of the city. arthur brown, noted architect in the city, wanted for a while to build a tower. he had become very interested in persian towers. it was the 1930's. it was all about machinery and sort of this amazing architecture, very powerful architecture. he convinced the rec park commission that building a tower in her memory would be the thing to do with her money. >> it was going to be a wonderful observation place because it was one of the
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)